55 results

Communicating the links between climate change and heat waves with the Climate Shift Index

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Journal: Weather, Climate and Society
  • Authors: Laura Thomas-Walters, Matthew H. Goldberg, Sanguk Lee, Aidan Lyde, Seth A. Rosenthal, Anthony Leiserowitz
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Academic Papers

Communicating heat-related risks to the public is increasingly important for both their own protection and to encourage mitigation policies. To test the impact of the Climate Shift Index (CSI), which quantifies how climate change affects the likelihood of extreme weather, an experiment was conducted with 3,902 American adults. Participants were informed that climate change made the July 2023 U.S. heat wave at least five times more likely. Variations in CSI wording and explanations were tested. All treatments increased the belief that climate change made the heat wave, and heat waves in general, more likely.

Climate Policy Wonk Turned Indie Pop Star: AJR’s Adam Met

  • Year of release: 2024
  • Name of podcast: Climate One
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Podcasts

This episode features an interview with climate policy expert and musician, Adam Met, who speaks about the parallels between a campaign to release a pop album and a climate advocacy one. Both involve engaging fans in something and bringing people together with a common mission. Adam shares examples of the strategies that he's learned from music and from climate and they make their way across both.

(Un)Natural Disasters: Communicating linkages between extreme events and climate change

  • Publication year: 2016
  • Publishing organization: World Meteorological Organization
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Guides & Reports

Recent research suggests that personal experience of extreme weather has only a small, short-lived effect on what people think about climate change. If they had help connecting the dots – that is, if scientific linkages were clearly articulated and reported more often and more accurately in the media – perhaps the effect of extreme weather on peoples’ views would be greater, leading to better planning to adapt to changes, improved behavioural change, and more action on climate change. This guide makes practical recommedations for how to better communicate the linkage between extreme events and climate change harnessing progress in the…

Unnatural disasters: Connecting the dots when communicating about extreme weather and climate change

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Publishing organization: Potential Energy and Yale Programme on Climate Change Communication
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Guides & Reports

This report is based on analysis spanning quantitative and qualitative research with nearly 72,000 Americans to better understand perception of extreme weather and climate change. It found that half of the respondents believe the changes to be “natural.” Using fresh language in these particularly 'teachable' moments can build understanding around the problem and generate enthusiasm for the solutions. After testing over 200 extreme weather message territories, the researchers found a platform that outperforms: “Unnatural disasters”. This simple phrase opens the door to conversations about the true cause: fossil fuels. It’s rooted in provocative but politically neutral language that can capture…

Six ways to change hearts and minds about climate change

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Publishing organization: Frame Works, The Climate Change Collaboration, Heard
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Guides & Reports

This is a framing guide to provide ideas and sentiments that can be articulated and expressed in different ways. It outlines six tips to frame climate change to improve public understanding and inspire action. The guide translates research into practice, connecting a broad body of research to practical recommendations.

Sell the Sizzle

  • Publication year: 2021
  • Publishing organization: Futerra
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Guides & Reports

Sell The Sizzle sets out the formula for compelling climate messages that actually change attitudes and behaviours. It emphasizes the importance of appealing to emotions and aspirations in climate change communications, rather than relying solely on facts and fears. It advocates for a marketing approach that highlights positive visions of a sustainable future, using engaging stories and relatable characters to inspire action.

A new era in climate communications

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Publishing organization: New Zero World
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Guides & Reports

This paper provides an in-depth analysis of current trends, strategies, and best practices in climate communication. It offers valuable insights into effective messaging approaches, audience engagement techniques, and the evolving landscape of climate discourse. Through case studies, research findings, and expert interviews, the paper explores how to communicate climate science accurately, engage diverse audiences, and inspire meaningful action in the face of the climate crisis.

How the public understands and reacts to the term “climate anxiety”

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Journal: Journal of Environmental Psychology
  • Authors: Thea Gregersen, Rouven Doran, Charles A. Ogunbode, Gisela Böhm
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Academic Papers

This study explores public perceptions and emotional responses to the concept of climate anxiety in Norway. Most respondents (52%) provided neutral descriptions (e.g., worry about climate change impacts), 27% viewed climate anxiety as unfounded, irrational, or excessive. These findings indicate that among some audiences, using the term climate anxiety may provoke reactance and be perceived as distracting from political actions to mitigate climate change. These results give important insights into the potential consequences of the terms we use when reporting on climate distress.

How to talk about climate change and the problem with doomerism

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Media: Resilience
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Articles

This article discusses the importance of effectively communicating about climate change without falling into a sense of hopelessness or "doomerism." It highlights the need for constructive dialogue that acknowledges the severity of the climate crisis while also offering pathways for action and solutions. It draws insights from a new study - the largest ever conducted in climate change behavior - that delves into the impact of climate doomerism and compares it with alternative messages.

Addressing climate change with behavioral science: A global intervention tournament in 63 countries

  • Publication year: 2024
  • Journal: Science Advances
  • Authors: Madalina Vlasceanu, Kimperly C. Doell et al.
  • Language: English
  • Post category:Academic Papers

Researchers tested the effects of the 11 common messages meant to boost climate change beliefs, policy support, and concrete action on a highly diverse sample of over 59,440 participants. The findings revealed that doom and gloom messaging was highly effective for stimulating climate change information sharing, like posting on the internet or social media, where negativity reigns. However, doom and gloom messaging was the absolute worst for motivating action and among the worst for changing climate change beliefs or support for climate change policies.